Type Less By Using The History Feature In Bash Shell To Recall Previous Linux Commands

Bash shell has a robust history feature which makes it easy to keep a track of previous commands that can be run again whenever needed. So if you spend a lot of time with Linux commands, this can save time by not entering same commands over and over. Seeing previously used commands: To get a list of previously used commands, from the shell/Terminal type: history This will show all the commands...

Quickly Make Sequential Directories In Bulk From Linux Terminal

Directories in an alphabetical or numbered sequence can be created directly from Linux Terminal in bulk. So for example, if a list of directories corresponding to years starting from say 2017 to 2020 need to be created, they can be done all through a single command. Here is how : From the Linux terminal, type : mkdir {2017..2020} The curly braces will contain the first and last entries while...

List All Built-In Bash Commands In Ubuntu / Linux Mint

Using the help feature to know more about a specific Bash command
With so many commands available at disposal from the Ubuntu / Linux Mint terminal, it can be useful to get a list of built-in commands supported by the Bash shell. (To get and idea about what a Linux shell is, refer to this brief overview of different shells in Linux  and to know how to use  various commands, refer to the Linux command line tutorial series). For getting the list of Bash commands,...

A Simple Linux Shell Script To Export WordPress MySQL Database

WordPress logo
One of the earlier posts explained how to backup WordPress databases directly through the Linux Terminal. Here is an example of a simple shell script that will ask for the password of MySQL user that has access to the particular WordPress MySQL database to be exported and  dump it into the the directory specified . (To know what are Linux shell scripts and how to make them, please refer to the basic...

Quickly Find Out List Of Open Files By Specific User Through Linux Mint / Ubuntu Terminal

Output of lsof for given user
It can be useful to get a list of all open files per user basis for a given Linux Mint / Ubuntu system. To do this quickly, open Terminal and type : lsof -u username This will generate an output of all open files by the user name specified. Run it as root to get a list of open files for any user.To make it more readable and stop scrolling through the screen, use the ‘less’ parameter : lsof...